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#1 mex

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 03:44 PM

Some of you know that we tried our hand at guiding this year. Here are a few pics from my last hunter, a 78 year old from PA with bad hips and a pacemaker. Super experienced, super nice guy. He didn't just talk the talk. He was willing to work and has taken a lot of elk. This was 2nd rifle season, October 7th through 12th. He was looking for a big bull.

 

Opening day we had him on a few shooters, but decided to hold off. One was a 5x6 and one was a 300-ish 5x. The 5x's up there have really good genes... great mass and amazing front ends.

 

Got on several nice bulls in the next few days, but mobility was an issue. His wife joined us on the hunts, and although they were 100% willing to work hard, they did their very best for me... but they just couldn't move very fast which kinda limited our ability to stalk. They did awesome though, I was impressed... no complaining.. did everything I asked. Great folks. Really hope I have their will and their ability when I'm their age.

 

On the second to last day we finally got him up close to a nice little herd. Archery-close. There were a few cows who had popped out of the brush, so we set up the sticks and waited for the rest of the herd.

 

As they worked out of the oak into the flats, a smaller bull came out. Smallish 5x. He was 10-12 yards in front of us. Told my hunter to lay off, not a shooter on this ranch. The wind was perfect so the 5x stuck around for at least 25 minutes. He saw us but wasn't alarmed. Stuck around long enough for the wife to get some good pics.

 

The herd bull (a 6x) was working through the brush off to the left. Maybe 15 yards. Started to get excited for my hunter... knew he was finally going to get a crack at a nice bull. Unfortunately when he came into full view, realized he had a broken right beam. Snapped below the royal. #3 was also broken at the base. Had to tell him to lay off. This guy had been fighting for the last 6 weeks but had still managed to hold on to his herd of about 23 cows. He looked haggard, but apparently there were a few cows still in estrous. He was still ready to whoop ass. He was chasing the 5x and another little spike around. He whooped that spike's ass and totally ran him out of the herd. Any time they got near those cows, he'd take after 'em. He'd have been a 320ish bull with all his ivory. Unfortunately we didn't get a shot that hunt... but the hunter had a great time.

 

Here's a few photos from that encounter. BTW my other 4 hunters were archery, and all four killed bigger bulls than anything I've ever taken, a fact which I love. Can't post those pics on a public forum because even though I took them, they are the property of my outfitter. If y'all ever want a fun hunt, it's well worth the money. Top notch. Everything is catered... great food... amazing facilities... great companionship with the guides and hunters... it is a blast. US Outfitters

 

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#2 mex

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 03:54 PM

Can't figure out how to upload... try these:

 

http://imgur.com/a/RQLaY

 

http://imgur.com/a/SuZC9

 

http://imgur.com/a/aYuoW

 

http://imgur.com/a/NVbhb

 

http://imgur.com/a/chEOG



#3 mex

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 03:57 PM

The 4th link is a photo of our camp. Cook shack, guide shack (rat-infested cabin with a roof :lol: ) and two hunter cabins... those are really nice.



#4 oldtimer

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 05:38 PM

awesome story. I smirked when I read your hunter was from PA. We are surrounded by people from PA and they are douche nozzles but we have friendly relations with them. Glad your experience with your clients were positive ones. I always wonder the mind set of those  who can afford those things..entitled? Grateful? Ya never know. Beautiful Country.Private ranch of 1000's of acres I assume? US Outfitters that rings a bell. Probably never will be able to afford an another Elk hunt but not mad about it.

 

Thanks for posting that the OD forum needed a shot of adrenaline.  Just what the DR ordered.



#5 oldtimer

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 05:48 PM

Crazy Man.. your( I assume its you altho did not mention last name) mentioned in a couple of the Testimonials..one of them from Higbee (Dwight Schauperl)..thats where we live now..small world

 

#6 mex

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 06:22 PM

awesome story. I smirked when I read your hunter was from PA. We are surrounded by people from PA and they are douche nozzles but we have friendly relations with them. Glad your experience with your clients were positive ones. I always wonder the mind set of those  who can afford those things..entitled? Grateful? Ya never know. Beautiful Country.Private ranch of 1000's of acres I assume? US Outfitters that rings a bell. Probably never will be able to afford an another Elk hunt but not mad about it.

 

Thanks for posting that the OD forum needed a shot of adrenaline.  Just what the DR ordered.

It's a huge ranch. Drove it for two entire days scouting in the summer. Saw less than half. They have many sections down low in the rimrock country, and many sections up high in the oak and pines.

 

The hunters have all been awesome... no sense of entitlement that I have seen, and my three hunts had probably 22 hunters total with 10 guides. Lots of fun... everyone was willing to help each other. My guys went 100% on archery so probably a good bet everyone was happy. Nobody was unwilling to work... nobody complained... everyone did great. 

 

By the time you factor in food, camping equipment, time packing, time unpacking, etc... you're spending several thousand dollars to hunt on a public draw where you do all the work, and may not even see a shooter. It's not that much more expensive for a guided hunt, considering there's no cooking, cleaning, scouting, or any other responsibilities that add up in time, and we all know time = money.

 

We take your elk apart in the field, quarter it, harvest the backstraps, hanging tenders, rib meat etc. Then we take all the meat back to camp where we have a giant walk-in cooler to hang the quarters and smaller cuts, and let the meat age for several days. For those who want a shoulder mount, we cape, clean and prep for taxidermist. We have chest freezers for capes. For those who go Euro, we skull out their trophy and have it ready to mount. The hunters don't have to lift a finger, and they aren't expected to. However, most of them really want to help and get elbow deep in their elk from what I have seen. All of my hunters helped cape and quarter their animals. Just show up with your clothes, your bow and some arrows. It's a hoot.


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#7 oldtimer

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 06:47 PM

 

Crazy Man.. you are( I assume its you altho did not mention last name) mentioned in a couple of the Testimonials..one of them from Higbee (Dwight Schauperl)..thats where we live now..small world

 

 

 

 

ooops



#8 mex

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 06:56 PM

ooops

He wasn't one of my guys. There is another guide with the same name... probably was him.   :)


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#9 MAUI

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 08:27 PM

Awesome Mex.., Good story.., I'm jealous..,

 

Sounds like a first class operation.., Nothin like being in the woods with competent people.., Like one of my hunting brothers used to say, "Happiness is a steaming gut pile"..,

 

I need to get down your way..,



#10 mex

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 09:41 PM

Awesome Mex.., Good story.., I'm jealous..,

 

Sounds like a first class operation.., Nothin like being in the woods with competent people.., Like one of my hunting brothers used to say, "Happiness is a steaming gut pile"..,

 

I need to get down your way..,

ya you do!

 

Gonna post another interesting story and a few more pics when I get off work... be on the lookout


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#11 mex

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 01:28 AM

OK here's another boring story so bear with me... Maybe I mentioned this to my elkstravaganza buddies via facebook so if it is a repeat story, my apologies. 

 

So while we were on the scouting trip to the ranch, the owner of the outfitting company took me up to one of the camps up high. When we arrived, there were about 5 NM Dept of Game and Fish trucks and a helicopter. I was like WTF is going on? Turned out they were on a research mission... tagging cows and calves so they can study calf mortality.  The rancher was kind enough to let them use his facilities for their 2 week expedition.

 

When we pulled in, one of the G&F guys approached the truck and said there was no water pressure in the bunk houses. We went into the cellar to see the pump house for the well. It was a standard pump just like we have in the brewery. I was fairly familiar with them. It seemed to be working fine, it was humming along nice and quiet. We disassembled the impeller housing and the blades were in good shape... spinning freely. Took apart the jet kit and lo and behold the nozzle had come loose. Water wasn't being directed into the impeller housing the right way, and it was cavitating. Luckily the threads on the nozzle were still good, so I just screwed it back into the jet mount and off she went. The G&F guys and gals were very happy, now they could take showers again. 

 

As we went into the cook shack, one of the gals approached us for some help. Turned out she was the head wildlife biologist for the state, and they had tracked a cow into some badlands.. and she had just given birth to a calf. They have about 48 hours to find the calves... before the calves are able to run away. Unfortunately the country was too rough for the chopper, so they asked us if we wanted to help them locate the calf. I was like WHO DO I HAVE TO KILL? Hell ya I wanted to tag along. So off we went.

 

Two of the Game and Fish officers got into their truck and headed out, we followed them in ours. It was about noon. When we arrived at the spot where they got the strongest signal, they parked. 

 

We headed up the hill, and the biologist had the headphones on listening to the radio receiver. We followed the signal to within about 100 yards of the calf. Then we had to find it on our own. I crested the top of a little hill, and I could smell the cow. Took a few more steps and ended up jumping her. We knew the calf was near. Sure enough my partner found him.

 

The pics show the calf, a little bull, and the crew. She carefully pulled the calf out from under the bush that momma had stashed him under, and covered him up with some canvas so he wouldn't freak out. Then they measured his teeth, umbilical cord segment, hooves, etc and then they weighed him. Once they had their data. They clipped a radio transmitter on his ear. 

 

Then they put him back under the same tree momma left him. They used gloves and were really mindful of human scent. Calves are completely odorless during the first few days... because they cannot move. Momma has to go off to feed, then return to nurse, then go off to water, then return to nurse, etc. The calves can't follow, so while they're alone, they are vulnerable to predators. That's why they have evolved to be odorless. Because you sure as hell can't see them once momma stuffs them into the bushes.

 

The whole time I was looking over my shoulders in case momma came back on a mission.

 

You might ask how they can track the birth of a calf? Great question. In the winter, after the rut, and after hunting season, they fly the chopper over the herds and run the cows until they are exhausted. Once the cows can no longer run at full speed, they shoot the net gun and catch the cows. They land the chopper, and they have a veteranarian draw a blood sample and run a preggo test. If it comes up positive, and it ususally does, they collar the cow, and then they insert a VIT (vaginal implant transmitter) right up into momma's business.  Those things are about the size of your fist.

 

The VIT is temperature sensitive. It stays nice and warm at body temp all winter and spring, and when the calf squirts out, the VIT squirts out too. Once it drops 20 degrees, the radio kicks on. They record the frequencies of each. The cows are on their own set of frequencies, and the VITs have another set. Makes it easier to find both the cows and the calves. Once the calf is born, they use the radio receiver to locate the beeps. Pretty cool.

 

 

 

http://imgur.com/a/h5y7c

 

http://imgur.com/a/Xz09i

 

http://imgur.com/a/pi5jD

 

http://imgur.com/a/l0mi0



#12 MAUI

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 02:19 AM

Man.., That's so cool..,



#13 azchief21

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 05:55 AM

Some of you know that we tried our hand at guiding this year. Here are a few pics from my last hunter, a 78 year old from PA with bad hips and a pacemaker. Super experienced, super nice guy. He didn't just talk the talk. He was willing to work and has taken a lot of elk. This was 2nd rifle season, October 7th through 12th. He was looking for a big bull.

 

Opening day we had him on a few shooters, but decided to hold off. One was a 5x6 and one was a 300-ish 5x. The 5x's up there have really good genes... great mass and amazing front ends.

 

Got on several nice bulls in the next few days, but mobility was an issue. His wife joined us on the hunts, and although they were 100% willing to work hard, they did their very best for me... but they just couldn't move very fast which kinda limited our ability to stalk. They did awesome though, I was impressed... no complaining.. did everything I asked. Great folks. Really hope I have their will and their ability when I'm their age.

 

On the second to last day we finally got him up close to a nice little herd. Archery-close. There were a few cows who had popped out of the brush, so we set up the sticks and waited for the rest of the herd.

 

As they worked out of the oak into the flats, a smaller bull came out. Smallish 5x. He was 10-12 yards in front of us. Told my hunter to lay off, not a shooter on this ranch. The wind was perfect so the 5x stuck around for at least 25 minutes. He saw us but wasn't alarmed. Stuck around long enough for the wife to get some good pics.

 

The herd bull (a 6x) was working through the brush off to the left. Maybe 15 yards. Started to get excited for my hunter... knew he was finally going to get a crack at a nice bull. Unfortunately when he came into full view, realized he had a broken right beam. Snapped below the royal. #3 was also broken at the base. Had to tell him to lay off. This guy had been fighting for the last 6 weeks but had still managed to hold on to his herd of about 23 cows. He looked haggard, but apparently there were a few cows still in estrous. He was still ready to whoop ass. He was chasing the 5x and another little spike around. He whooped that spike's ass and totally ran him out of the herd. Any time they got near those cows, he'd take after 'em. He'd have been a 320ish bull with all his ivory. Unfortunately we didn't get a shot that hunt... but the hunter had a great time.

 

Here's a few photos from that encounter. BTW my other 4 hunters were archery, and all four killed bigger bulls than anything I've ever taken, a fact which I love. Can't post those pics on a public forum because even though I took them, they are the property of my outfitter. If y'all ever want a fun hunt, it's well worth the money. Top notch. Everything is catered... great food... amazing facilities... great companionship with the guides and hunters... it is a blast. US Outfitters

 

attachicon.gifDSCN1404a.jpg

Great story, great pix. I might have taken that bull anyway. Sounds like a bad ass!!!



#14 oldtimer

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 03:45 PM

you certainly live the life buddy... awesome



#15 mex

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 04:15 PM

Been lucky for sure. (don't tell wilkie I said that)



#16 oldtimer

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 04:57 PM

Been lucky for sure. (don't tell wilkie I said that)

:lol:



#17 Semo

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 07:02 PM

What is the cost, Mex? A buddy of mine has a guided whitetail and turkey hunting business up in Putnam County (NE Missouri). $500 a day, but that includes lodging and food. Mostly lawyers and such from the Southeast make up his clientele. They have some monster kills. Don't know what he puts in the food plots.

#18 oldtimer

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 08:26 PM

What is the cost, Mex? A buddy of mine has a guided whitetail and turkey hunting business up in Putnam County (NE Missouri). $500 a day, but that includes lodging and food. Mostly lawyers and such from the Southeast make up his clientele. They have some monster kills. Don't know what he puts in the food plots.

 

 

if you hit the US Outfitters link it'll tell you..depends on where and what and how big you want. Prices are not outrageous  in comparison to others I have seen



#19 Semo

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 08:46 PM

if you hit the US Outfitters link it'll tell you..depends on where and what and how big you want. Prices are not outrageous in comparison to others I have seen


Thanx

#20 mex

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 08:48 PM

What is the cost, Mex? A buddy of mine has a guided whitetail and turkey hunting business up in Putnam County (NE Missouri). $500 a day, but that includes lodging and food. Mostly lawyers and such from the Southeast make up his clientele. They have some monster kills. Don't know what he puts in the food plots.

500/day seems reasonable for a real whitetail hunt especially if there are some big Missouri bucks in there.

 

Any time I hear about those guided hunts out east tho, it makes me worry they might be highfence properties. Know a guy in Ohio that has 275 acres of highfence and he has feeders scattered all over the property with ladder stands beside each one. At 8:00am every morning the feeder starts to whirlin' and out come the deer like cats to a can opener. Charges a shitload... in fact IIRC he charges by the tine.

 

He offered me a hunt about 10 years ago but I politely declined... not really what I call hunting.

 

I know the archery/rifle elk hunts with my outfitter are about 6900ish for 5 days/6 nights, which includes licensing, rooms, 3 excellent meals per day, warm bunks hot showers... and handsome, knowledgeable (and humble) guides.  :lol:

 

There ain't no feeders. Just thousands of acres all to yourself. Gotta use skills to get on the game, and that includes the hunters too. Nothing is easy and nothing is given. Every harvest is earned.

 

It's the story you're paying for... the meat's just a bonus.


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